Enjoying Azalea Blossoms and their rich symbolism with kids

Enjoying Azalea Blossoms and their rich symbolism with kids…

The Azalea ~ the hardy plant with gloriously colorful and profuse blossoms, its name derives from the Greek azaleos, meaning dry.  The Azalea flourishes in dry soil and is known for its dry, brittle wood. Makes sense!

The Azalea is a member of the Rhododendron family and is used as an ornamental shrub in gardens and hedges. Blooming in Spring, the Azalea brings gardens alive with its fragrant, showy flowers in pinks, purples, whites, reds, oranges and yellows.  Some varieties of the Azalea are striped, blotched, dotted or flecked.  In China, the Azalea is known as the Royalty of the Garden…

 

~ Colt State Park, Bristol, RI ~
~ Colt State Park, Bristol, RI ~
~ Azaleas at Colt State Park, Bristol, RI ~
~ Azaleas at Colt State Park, Bristol, RI ~
~ Colt State Park, Bristol, RI ~
~ Colt State Park, Bristol, RI ~

There are also variations of shapes in Azalea flowers. Petals may be rounded, pointy or linear, and margins may be flat, frilled, ruffled or wavy.  Flower shapes may even change from year to year on the same plant.  All of this keeps the Azalea very intriguing.

The most common symbol associated with the Azalea is temperanceself-restraint and moderation.

But the Azalea is also symbolic of passion and fragility, and in China has been known as “the thinking of home” shrub.

Let your kids in on the secrets of the Azalea.  Discover these beauties in gardens, hedges, in hanging baskets and pots.  Look closely for their differences in size, shape and color.  Tell of the symbols of the Azalea, then whisper the delightful secret that the Azalea will always make you think of home.

Why not bring home your own Azalea today, as the Royalty of YOUR Garden!

So regal!

Enjoying Azalea Blossoms and their rich symbolism with kids was last modified: May 7th, 2016 by Sharon Couto
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Enjoying Azalea Blossoms and their rich symbolism with kids was last modified: May 7th, 2016 by Sharon Couto