SEPTEMBER IDIOMS: “Wear your heart on your sleeve” on Day 254 of 365 Days of Literacy for Kids

Here on 365 Days of Literacy for Kids, your kids will be “dressed” with IDIOMS during the month of September.

IDIOMS are phrases that reveal “secrets” from the past. IDIOMS come from many sources, many languages, many authors, many cultures.  The “hidden” meanings in IDIOMS are great fun for kids, but also teach important, interesting and intriguing lessons in how language has developed and evolved over time.

Each SEPTEMBER IDIOM on 365 Days of Literacy for Kids will address something to do with clothing… such as teaching kids the meaning of the very expressive wear your heart on your sleeve idiom.

– The idiom wear your heart on your sleeve means to express your feelings, emotions or intentions openly and honestly.

Origin of wear your heart on your sleeve Idiom:  Wear your heart on your sleeve is a term used as far back as the 17th century by writers such as Shakespeare and Sir Walter Scott.  It was common for a young lady to give a young man a ribbon or favor to wear on his sleeve as a display of love.

– The idiom wear your heart on your sleeve has evolved to mean any outward display of emotion… such as joy, happiness or even disappointment or sadness.  Do your kids or grandkids know anyone who simply cannot hide their emotions and wear their hearts on their sleeves?

Dress your kids for back-to-school success with knowledge and attention to wear your heart on your sleeve!

Take a few minutes each day in SEPTEMBER to teach the secrets of IDIOMS to your kids & grandkids.  Understanding IDIOMS is a wonderful way to enrich reading and language development.

And I’m not just talking through my hat!

SEPTEMBER IDIOMS: “Wear your heart on your sleeve” on Day 254 of 365 Days of Literacy for Kids was last modified: September 12th, 2011 by Sharon Couto
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SEPTEMBER IDIOMS: “Wear your heart on your sleeve” on Day 254 of 365 Days of Literacy for Kids was last modified: September 12th, 2011 by Sharon Couto